Where does life take us?
We develop from many individual brains to one collective mind, with main purpose to survive upcoming threats and dangers. Many of these issues we cause ourselves, because our population increase outpaces the growth of our intelligence. Trials to compensate for that go via complex computer networks, with nodes that emulate the human brain power to work with non-information and not just with encoded binary stuff. “The Net” already talks to you, listens, reads and recognizes content in text and pictures, and is able to find correlations you never thought of before. The internet of things (“IoT“) moves control of your individual life to structures, independent of brain and interpretation, while soothing us with ease of use (remember: I started saying that our brain is lazy by nature!). In the end there will be yet unknown challenges for humanity and Earth, for which we need to transcend our inherited animal restrictions.

This is the era of transparency. This is the time that exposes our petty secrets to show we didn’t look at the bigger picture. Nothing is kept hidden anymore. Technology ultimately discloses everything one tries to hide for the public eye. Main reason for this is to overcome our fundamental limitation: polarized dualistic thinking. This world is confronted with big challenges to set aside preconceptions about what’s right or wrong. While we badly need a progressive mindset, we see strong conservative and populist counter reactions. It looks like the old dictator style gains momentum again. But in our hearts we know that survival of the fittest does not automatically yield survival of the clan or the species. History has shown that time after time. It’s hard to acknowledge that we need to surpass our primitive instincts and listen to the needs of collective survival. Populism doesn’t fit in a complex world order, even though some countries and groups of people seem to favor that attitude. They show fear to deal with the unknown, rather than put relentless effort in creating diversity as essential condition for biological evolution. We know that closed communities often do not embrace enough variation to prevent inbreeding and dementia. Orthodox mindsets in the end will be a disadvantage over those that can adapt to the needs of the future. We need to develop values and ethics in transcendent mode versus imposing restrictive selection criteria on people. We need to step away from the idea that a single brain can solve this complexity.

Maybe it helps when realizing that from a distance, our planet is just a tiny dot in a bigger system. It moves on, regardless of our problems. Who knows what we’ll find out there, watching us and our petty debates. We should look outwards, instead of at our own protectionist interests. On Earth the total entropy (food, wealth, power) doesn’t change, but as long as distribution differences are too big, we’ll occupy ourselves with internal battles instead of building on a new evolutionary step forward.

 

Preface4. The futureConclusion